Competitor or Compatriot? Hungarian Film in the Shadow of the Swastika, 1933–44

Title

Competitor or Compatriot? Hungarian Film in the Shadow of the Swastika, 1933–44

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Contributing USMA Research Unit(s)

History, Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies

Description

Frey's article provides a general overview of Hungarian-German film relations from 1933-1944. It begins with a discussion of the purge of non-Germans from German cinema (1932-34) and the impact of this purge on the development of the Hungarian film industry. It then progresses through a general consideration of the Kulturpolitik and Filmpolitik between Nazi Germany and Hungary through the 1930s. This segment focuses on shared notions of “national film”; the centrality of antisemitism; and the triangular relationship between Germany,Hungary, and the United States. Using previous undiscovered primary source material, the article considers German pressure onHungary to remove Jewish figures from the domestic Hungarian film industry.

The onset of the Second World War enabled Hungary to complete its transformation from fledgling film maker to the continent’s third most prolific producer of sound feature film (trailing only Germany and Italy in 1942). Despite attempts to resolve differences and increase the number of co-productions, Germany and Hungary found themselves at loggerheads over film matters with greater and greater frequency. This article explains those areas of contest and competition, and occasional cooperation.

Publication Date

2012

Document Type

Book Chapter

Publisher City

New York

Keywords

Jews, Nazis, Hungary, Film, Motion Pictures, Movies, Antisemitism

Comments

Chapter in Cinema and the Swastika. The International Expansion of Third Reich Cinema, edited by Roel Vande Winkel and David Welch, pages 159-171.

Competitor or Compatriot? Hungarian Film in the Shadow of the Swastika, 1933–44

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